Con motivo de su período vacacional de verano 2016, la universidad suspenderá sus actividades a partir del jueves 28 de julio, reanudando las mismas el lunes 15 de agosto de 2016. Para más información consulte la Circular No. 9.

PEPE Spanish Summer Course

Redireccionando a PEPE Spanish Summer Course 2016 www.cgci.udg.mx/pepe2016

PEPE Spanish Summer Course 2016

 
Universidad de Guadalajara
   PEPE Spanish Summer Course 2016
 
June 24th - July 24th
3
weeks in Guadalajara
1
week in Puerto Vallarta
60
hours of Spanish course
40
20 hours of workshops and 20 hours of history and Mexican culture
1-1
Spanish conversation with local students
"Raise your intercultural awareness and develop your linguistic skills, come to Mexico to learn Spanish and to live the experience interacting with the Mexican culture!"

In addition, students will be given the opportunity to participate in service learning activities where all participants will volunteer to benefit the educational community of Jalisco (this activity is optional).
   PEPE Program Details
For this summer, the PEPE Spanish Summer Course will take place in two different University Centers, one of them located in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara and the other near the beaches of Puerto Vallarta.
CUCEA
CUCosta
 
Zapopan, Jalisco
June 24th - July 17th
Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco
July 18th - July 24th

 

   Why is Spanish so important?
 
1
of the most commonly spoken languages in USA
1
of the six official languages of the United Nations
2nd
most widely understood language in the Western Hemisphere
20
million speakers as a foreign language
60
million speakers as a second language
406
million native speakers worldwide
 
   The state of Jalisco
Jalisco is located in Western Mexico and it is divided in 125 municipalities, its capital is Guadalajara.
It is one of the most important states in Mexico because of its natural resources as well as its history.
Many of the characteristic traits of Mexican culture are originally from Jalisco; mariachi, charreria, jaripeo, tequila and others.
 
  
   University of Guadalajara
niversity leader in developing students‘ professional skills in middle and higher education, being the second largest public institution in Mexico.
 
istinguished by the most important international book fair of Ibero-America, the largest international film festival in Mexico, its libraries, museums and its soccer team.
 
xperienced with several years promoting scientific and technological research, collaborating with institutions from all over the world.
 
reat academic atmosphere and student environment, are appreciated by international students who already lived the experience.
 
  
   Requirements & documents
Requirements:
1. Be a current University student.
2. Register in "Sistema Minerva".
3. Take the Spanish language test.
4. Provide proof of health insurance with     International coverage.    
Documents:
1. Official transcript (including grades of the     last academic term at home institution).
2. Curriculum Vitae (two pages maximum).
3. Passport (valid until December 2016).
 
 
 
   Costs
The cost is $ 2,000 USD, UdeG is offering partials grants from 25% up to 50%, the fee includes:

• Course and materials
• Room & Board
• Cultural activities
• Workshops
• Welcome kit
• Transportation airport
    – hotel – airport
• Certificate of
    attendance

 

To apply for the scholarship please follow this instructions:
1. Write an email to ufi_cgci@cgci.udg.mx showing interest to participate in PEPE
2. Complete your information in Minerva´s web page: http://minerva.udg.mx/
3. Complete the placement test https://es.surveymonkey.com/r/examenubicacionpepe2016
4. Write a brief letter of purpose explaining the reasons and interests for applying to the PEPE
    program (http://minerva.udg.mx/ Etapa 1)

*Important:
1. The cost does not include health insurance, local transportation and air     fare.
2. Housing provided is in a hotel: shared bedroom, free Wi-Fi and laundry
    facilities available.
   Registration
 
Deadline:
June 6th, 2016
 
   Language goals
  • Make an introduction and use basic greeting and leave-taking expressions.
  • Ask how people are and react to news.
  • Understand everyday expressions aimed at the satisfaction of simple needs of a concrete type, delivered directly to him/her in clear, slow and repeated speech by a sympathetic speaker.
  • Understand questions and instructions addressed carefully and slowly to him/her and follow short, simple directions.
  • Ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Ask and answer questions about themselves and other people, where they live, people they know, things they have. 
  • Indicate time by such phrases as next week, last Friday, in November, three o'clock.
  • Ask for or pass on personal details in written form
  • Write a short simple postcard
  • Write numbers and dates, own name, nationality, address, age, date of birth or arrival in the country etc. such as on a hotel registration form.
  • Write simple isolated phrases and sentences.
  • Write simple phrases and sentences about themselves and imaginary people, where they live and what they do.
  • Manage very short, isolated, mainly pre-packaged utterances, with much pausing to search for expressions, to articulate less familiar words, and to repair communication.
  • Have a very basic range of simple expressions about personal details and needs of a concrete type.
  • Have a basic vocabulary repertoire of isolated words and phrases related to particular concrete situations.
  • Show only limited control of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns in a learnt repertoire.
  • Link words or groups of words with very basic linear connectors like 'and' or 'then'.
  • Establish social contact: greetings and farewells; introductions; giving thanks.
  • Understand clear, standard speech on familiar matters directed at him/her, provided he/she can ask for repetition or reformulation from time to time.
  • Participate in short conversations in routine contexts on topics of interest.
  • Express how he/she feels in simple terms, and express thanks
  • Handle very short social exchanges but is rarely able to understand enough to keep conversation going of his/her own accord, though he/she can be made to understand if the speaker will take the trouble.
  • Use simple everyday polite forms of greeting and address
  • Make and respond to invitations, invitations and apologies.
  • Say what he/she likes and dislikes.
  • Understand enough to manage simple, routine exchanges without undue effort.
  • Deal with practical everyday demands: finding out and passing on straightforward factual information.
  • Ask and answer questions about habits and routines.
  • Ask and answer questions about pastimes and past activities.
  • Give and follow simple directions and instructions e.g. explain how to get somewhere.
  • Communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information.
  • Exchange limited information on familiar and routine operational matters
  • Ask and answer questions about what they do at work and in free time
  • Ask for and give directions referring to a map or plan.
  • Ask for and provide personal information. Can write short, simple formulaic notes relating to matters in areas of immediate need.
  • Write very simple personal letters expressing thanks and apology.
  • Take a short, simple message provided he/she can ask for repetition and reformulation.
  • Write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need.
  • Write a series of simple phrases and sentences linked with simple connectors like “and", “but” and “because”.
  • Write about everyday aspects of his environment e.g. people, places, a job or study experience in linked sentences.
  • Write very short, basic descriptions of events, past activities and personal experiences.
  • Write a series of simple phrases and sentences about their family, living conditions, educational background, present or most recent job.
  • Write short, simple imaginary biographies and simple poems about people.
  • Take notes as a list of key points during a straightforward lecture, provided te topic is familiar, and the talk is both formulated in simple language and delivered in clearly articulated standard speech.
  • Construct phrases on familiar topics with sufficient ease to handle short exchanges, despite very noticeable hesitation and false starts.
  • Have a repertoire of basic language, which enables him/her to deal with everyday situations with predictable content, though he/she will generally have to compromise the message and search for words.
  • Produce brief everyday expressions in order to satisfy simple needs of a concrete type: personal details, daily routines, wants and needs, requests for information.
  • Use basic sentence patterns and communicate with memorised phrases, groups of a few words and formulae about themselves and other people, what they do, places, possessions etc..
  • Have a limited repertoire of short memorised phrases covering predictable survival situations; frequent breakdowns and misunderstandings occur in non-routine situations.
  • Have a sufficient vocabulary for the expression of basic communicative needs.
  • Have a sufficient vocabulary for coping with simple survival needs.
  • Control a narrow repertoire dealing with concrete everyday needs.
  • Have sufficient vocabulary to conduct routine, everyday transactions involving familiar situations and topics.
  • Use reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns associated with more predictable situations.
  • Use some simple structures correctly, but still systematically makes basic mistakes - for example tends to mix up tenses and forget to mark agreement; nevertheless, it is usually clear what he/she is trying to say.
  • Use the most frequently occurring connectors to link simple sentences in order to tell a story or describe something as a simple list of points.
  • Link groups of words with simple connectors like "and, "but" and "because".
  • Make him/herself understood in short contributions, even though pauses, false starts and reformulation are very evident.
  • Enter unprepared into conversations on familiar topics.
  • Follow clearly articulated speech directed at him/her in everyday conversation, though will sometimes have to ask for repetition of particular words and phrases.
  • Maintain a conversation or discussion but may sometimes be difficult to follow when trying to say exactly what he/she would like to.
  • Express and respond to feelings such as surprise, happiness, sadness, interest and indifference.
  • Exchange, check and confirm accumulated factual information on familiar routine and non-routine matters within his field with some confidence.
  • Describe how to do something, giving detailed instructions.
  • Summarise and give his or her opinion about a short story, article, talk, discussion interview, or documentary and answer further questions of detail.
  • Find out and pass on straightforward factual information. 
  • Ask for and follow detailed directions
  • Obtain more detailed information.
  • Convey information and ideas on abstract as well as concrete topics, check information and ask about or explain problems with reasonable precision.
  • Write personal letters and notes asking for or conveying simple information of immediate relevance, getting across the point he/she feels to be important
  • Write straightforward connected texts on a range of familiar subjects within his field of interest, by linking a series of shorter discrete elements into a linear sequence.
  • Write straightforward, detailed descriptions on a range of familiar subjects within his field of interest.
  • Write accounts of experiences, describing feelings and reactions in simple connected text.
  • Write a description of an event, a recent trip - real or imagined.
  • Narrate a story.
  • Have enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to express him/herself with some hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events, but lexical limitations cause repetition and even difficulty with formulation at times.
  • Take notes during a lecture, which are precise enough for his/her own use at a later date, provided the topic is within his/her field of interest and the talk is clear and well structured.
  • Take notes as a list of key points during a straightforward lecture, provided the topic is familiar, and the talk is both formulated in simple language and delivered in clearly articulated standard speech.
  • Communicate with reasonable accuracy in familiar contexts; generally good control though with noticeable mother tongue influence. Errors occur, but it is clear what he/she is trying to express.
  • Use reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used "routines" and patterns associated with more predictable situations.
  • Show good control of elementary vocabulary but major errors still occur when expressing more complex thoughts or handling unfamiliar topics and situations.
  • Express him/herself with relative ease. Despite some problems with formulation resulting in pauses and "cul-de-sacs", he/she is able to keep going effectively without help.
  • Keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident, especially in longer stretches of free production.
  • Engage in extended conversation on most general topics in a clearly participatory fashion, even in a noisy environment.
  • Sustain relationships with native speakers without unintentionally amusing or irritating them or requiring them to behave other than they would with a native speaker.
  • Convey degrees of emotion and highlight the personal significance of events and experiences.
  • Understand and exchange complex information and advice on the full range of matters related to his/her occupational role.
  • Pass on detailed information reliably.
  • Give a clear, detailed description of how to carry out a procedure.
  • Synthesise and report information and arguments from a number of sources.
  • Express news and views effectively in writing, and relate to those of others.
  • Write clear, detailed descriptions of real or imaginary events and experiences marking the relationship between ideas in clear connected text, and following established conventions of the genre concerned.
  • Write clear, detailed texts on a variety of subjects related to his field of interest, synthesising and evaluating information and arguments from a number of sources.
  • Write clear, detailed descriptions on a variety of subjects related to his/her field of interest.
  • Write a review of a film, book or play.
  • Understand a clearly structured lecture on a familiar subject, and can take notes on points which strike him/her as important, even though he/she tends to concentrate on the words themselves and therefore to miss some information.
  • Express him/herself clearly and without much sign of having to restrict what he/she wants to say.
  • Have a sufficient range of language to be able to give clear descriptions, express viewpoints and develop arguments without much conspicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so.
  • Have a sufficient range of language to describe unpredictable situations, explain the main points in an idea or problem with reasonable precision and express thoughts on abstract or cultural topics such as music and films.
  • Have a good grammatical control. Occasional "slips" or non-systematic errors and minor flaws in sentence structure may still occur, but they are rare and can often be corrected in retrospect.
  • Show a relatively high degree of grammatical control. Does not make mistakes which lead to misunderstanding.
  • Have a high lexical accuracy (generally), though some confusion and incorrect word choice does occur without hindering communication.
  • Communicate spontaneously, often showing remarkable fluency and ease of expression in even longer complex stretches of speech.
  • Produce stretches of language with a fairly even tempo; although he/she can be hesitant as he/she searches for patterns and expressions, there are few noticeably long pauses.
  • Interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without imposing strain on either party.
 
   Mexican Culture Program

This course aims to develop communicative competence in Spanish. The course content is benchmarked with the linguistic descriptors of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFRL) for Languages which is described in Spanish as follows:

Week 1

June 29th - July 2nd

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 1
We

  • Verb conjugation ar/er/ir
  • To be, to have
  • My name is…
  • Numbers 1-100
  • Alphabet 
  • Nationalities
  • Asking and giving personal information
  • Greetings/good bye

Unit 2
I want to learn Spanish

  • Simple present
  • Verbs ar/er/ir
  • Prepositions: a, con, de, por y para
  • Articles el/la/los/las
  • Personal pronouns
  • Classroom objects
  • Numbers from 100 to…
  • Expressing intentions
  • Expressing interests
  • Explaining reasons of what we do

Unit 3
Where is Santiago?

  • There is/there are
    Haber
  • Verb to be
  • Superlative
  • Articles un/una
  • Question words: Qué, cuál, cuáles, cuántos, cuántas, dónde, cómo
  • Describing places and countries
  • Giving directions
  • Talking about the weather

Week 2

July  6th- 9th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 4
What do you prefer?

  • Demonstratives
  • What + nouns?
  • To have +infinitive
  • Colors
  • Clothes
  • Daily life objects
  • Identifying objects
  • Expressing needs
  • Asking for products in a store
  • Asking for prices

Unit 5
Your Friends are my friends

  • Verb to like
  • Possessives
  • Family members
  • Family relationships
  • Describing appearance and personality
  • Asking and expressing likes and dislikes
  • Contrasting likes

Review and assessment

Week 3

June 13th – 16th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 6
Day by day

  • Present (irregular verbs)
  • Reflexive verbs
  • So do I/ neither do I
  • Days of the week
  • Months
  • First, after, then
  • Talking about habits
  • Expressing Frequency
  • Telling the time

Unit 7
Let’s eat!

  • Impersonal  particle “se”
  • Verbs to bring and to put
  • Meals
  • Eating hábits
  • Asking and giving information about food in a restaurant

Unit 8
A movie star life

  • Past tenses
  • To start+ infinitive
  • To go
  • Past markers
  • Expressing past events

Week 4

June 21st – 24th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 9
Your ideal neighborhood 

  • Imperfect indicative
  • Quantifiers
  • Services of a neighborhood
  • Describing cities
  • Describing habits in the past
  • Talking about what I like the most of a place

Unit 10
Do you remember?
Final Review

  • Asking and giving personal information
  • Expressing likes and dislikes
  • Talking about personal relationships
  • Describing a person
  • Talking about habits and past experiences

Review and assessment

 

 

Week 1

June 29th - July 2nd

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 1
Spanish and you

  • Regular and Irregular present tenses
  • Reflexive verbs
  • Words to express reason and cause

    Por qué
    porque
    Para 

  • Expressive habits
  • Talking about motivations
  • Talking about difficulties
  • Making suggestions
  • Expressing intentions

Unit 2
Home sweet home

  •  Regular and Irregular present tenses
     
  • comparatives
  • Furniture and parts of the house
  • Forms, styles and materials
  • Expressing likes and dislikes
  • Describing a house
  • Describing objects

Unit 3
This is me!

  • Irregular present tenses
  • Article + adjective
  • Article + of + noun
  • Clothes
  • Parts of the body
  • Describing people
  • Talk about similarities and differences between people

Week 2

July  6th- 9th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 4
Can I take you a picture?

  • Be + gerund
    …ando
    …iendo
    …yendo
  • Phrases and words to express in different levels of discourse.
  • Making invitations, presentations, Greetings and farewells
  • Asking for a favor
  • Asking and giving permission
  • Expressing excuses

Unit 5
Free time

  •  Present perfect
  • Go to + infinitive
  •  Yet
  • already
  • Talking about recreational activities
  • Telling past experiences
  • Describing places

Unit 6
I cook very well

  • Direct object pronouns
  • Impersonal forms of “se”
  • Verb to be
  •  And/ but/ also
  • Talking about likes and eating habits

Review and assessment

Week 3

June 13th – 16th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 7
We loved it

  • Present perfect and simple past
  • I’d like to + infinitive
  • Seems
  • Get along with
  • Expressing hopes and wishes

Unit 8
We are very well

  • Verbs
  • To be- Ser/estar
  •  Sickness 
  • Symptoms
  • Parts of the body
  • Giving a pieces of advices
  • Describing a mood Expressing pain and discomfort

Unit 9
Before and now

  • Imperfect
  • Not anymore/ still
  • Talking about habits and events in the past
  • Argue
  • Debate

Week 4

June 21st – 24th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 10
Special moments

  • Past tense
  • Contrast past tense and imperfect
  • Simple past of be + gerund
  • Past markers
  • Leyends
  • Embarrassing moments
  • Talking about past events
  • Following sequence in stories

Unit 11
I looked for and compared

  •  imperative
  • Reflexive pronouns
  • Direct and indirect object
  •  Words to describe a scene
  • Advertising campaign 
  • Giving instructions
  • Giving suggestions
  • Giving advises
  • Describing a scene in the past and in the present

Unit 12
Tomorrow

  • Conditionals if + present, future
  • Simple present
  • Future will
  • Future markers
  • Words to express a hypothesis: /probably/ causally
  • Talking about future actions
  • Expressing conditions

Review and assessment

 

 

Week 1

June 29th - July 2nd

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 1
Start again

  • Present perfect
  • Simple past
  • Imperfect
  • Paraphrasing
    Starting
    Stopping
    finishing
  • Talking about habits in the present
  • Telling past events
  • Locating and action in the time

Unit 2
Prohibit is Prohibited 

  • It is normal + infinitive
  • I used to+ infinitive
  • Habits
  • All the world
  • Most of the
  • Many/some
  • Expressing prohibited  actions
  • Expressing mandatory activities
  • Expressing impersonality

Unit 3
Messages

  • Telephoning verbs
  • Strategies for making phone calls he said that
  • He asked me if
  • Making phone call
  • Leaving a message
  • Reporting a message

Week 2

July  6th- 9th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 4
He says that

  • Direct and indirect object pronouns
  • Connectors
    Linking words
  • Telling stories in present
  • Arguing

Unit 5
¡Stop!

  • Present subjunctive
  • Want, ask for
  • Expressing wishes complains and needs

Unit 6
The turist

  • Past perfect
  • Words and phrases to tell anecdotes
  • Talking about cause and consequences

Review and assessment

Week 3

June 13th – 16th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 7
We have to talk

  • Simple present
  • Verbs without gradation
  • Words to argue
  • Words to express anger
  • Phrases to start an opinion
  • Expressing inters and feelings
  • Talking about relationships
  • Expressing agreements and disagreements

Unit 8
Design

  • Superlatives ismo/a/os/as
  • Adjectives and modifiers
  • Exclamatory Phrases
  • phrases related with prepositions
  • Making opinions about objects

Unit 9
Mysterious

  • Future simple and future perfect
  • Indicative y subjunctive
  • Express different levels of certainty
  • Making hypothesis
  • Telling mysterious stories

Week 4

June 21st – 24th

Grammar content

Vocabulary

Functions

Unit 10
Good news

  • Passive voice
  • Reporter speech verbs
  • Mass Media
  • Tell and report a new

Unit 11
I’d never do it

  • Conditionals
  • subjunctive Imperfect 
  • If I were
  • If I have
  • I didn’t know that
  • Giving a piece of advise
  • Relating imaginary situations
  • Expressing wishes

Unit 12
America

  • Past tenses
  • Present subjunctive
  • Latin-American Cities
  • Spanglish
  • Expressing past events
  • Expressing knowledge about a topic

Review and assessment

 

 

Subject

Mexican Culture

   Content

Unit 1 Mexico
Objective: Create awareness of the human and geographical diversity of Mexico.
To understand the symbols that identify Mexico in the world.

  • 1.1 Awareness of human and geographical diversity of Mexico.
    • 1.1.1 Geography.
    • 1.1.2 Natural Resources.
  • 1.2 Status of Mexico in the world.
    • 1.2.1 Symbols of identity.
  • 1.3 Symbols that identify Mexico.
    • 1.3.1 Mexican linguistic variation.
    • 1.3.2 Mexico in numbers.

 

Unit 2 Mexico today
Objective: To determine the ethnic diversity as a generator of culture. To analyze the value of the family in Mexican society. Foster respect to cultural diversity.

  • 2.1 The ethnic diversity as a generator of culture.
    • 2.1.1 Mexican Population, fusion of cultures.
    • 2.1.2 Economy.
    • 2.1.3 Politics.
  • 2.2 The value of the family in the society.
    • 2.2.1 The Mexican family.
  • 2.3 Respect for diversity.
    • 2.3.1 Religion.
    • 2.3.2 Education.
    • 2.3.3 How are the Mexicans?

 

Unit 3 Indigenous Mexico
Objective: To understand the present through the contribution of pre-Columbian cultures.

  • 3.1 The respect for the pre-Columbian cultures.
    • 3.1.1 Mesoamerica territory.
  • 3.2 To value the past to understand the present.
    • 3.2.1 The Teotihuacan culture.
    • 3.2.2 The Mexica or Aztec culture.
    • 3.2.3 The Mayan culture.

 

Unit 4 Mexico mixed race
Objective: To recognize the major historical facts of Mexico and its protagonists.

  • 4.1 Awareness of the past to appreciate the present.
    • 4.1.1 Encounter of Two Worlds.
    • 4.1.2 Colonial Era.
    • 4.1.3 The independence.
    • 4.1.4 Foreign invasions.
    • 4.1.5 The Mexican Revolution.
  • 4.2 Great episodes that make up the Mexico of today.
    • 4.2.1 The XX and XXI centuries.

 

Unit 5 Flavors and colors
Objective: To present the products of American origin and traditional Mexican cuisine.

  • 5.1 The discovery of products of American origin in today's diet.
    • 5.1.1 The chili and its varieties.
    • 5.1.2 The corn.
    • 5.1.3 The chocolate.
  • 5.2 Recognition of the variety and richness of Mexican cuisine.
    • 5.2.1. Mexican dishes
    • 5.2.2 The Mexican diet.

 

Unit 6 Mexico and arts
Objective: to know the life and work of the greatest exponents of literature, painting and national cinema.

  • 6.1 To recognize artists as great exponents of a mentality.
  • 6.2 Assessment of the great artistic landmarks.
    • 6.2.1 Literature.
    • 6.2.2 Painting: the Mexican muralist.
    • 6.2.3 Mexican cinema.

 

Unit 7 Traditions
Objective: To promote the values and customs of Mexican traditions.

  • 7.1 Values and customs of Mexican celebrations.
    • 7.1.1 Christmas in Mexico.
    • 7.1.2 The Day of the Dead.
    • 7.1.3 Independence Day.
    • 7.1.4 The Easter.
    • 7.1.5 Visit to the Basilica of Guadalupe.
    • 7.1.6 The Charrería.
    • 7.1.7 The Guelaguetza.
    • 7.1.8 The Mañanitas.
  • 7.2 The respect for the traditions.

 

Unit 8 Popular Culture
Objective: To present two cultural activities in Mexico: Sports and music.

  • 8.1 To recognize the major sport representatives.
    • 8.1.1 Viva el football!
    • 8.1.2 The Lucha libre.
    • 8.1.3 Mesoamerican ball game.
  • 8.2 The respect for diversity and cultural idiosyncrasies.
    • 8.2.1 The popular music.
    • 8.2.2 Musical bands.
    • 8.2.3 The youthful expression.

 

Unit 9 Discovery Mexico!
Objective: Explore the landscapes, cultural and touristic diversity.

  • 9.1 Discovery of the great tourist diversity of Mexico and its attractions.
    • 9.1.1 Mayan World.
    • 9.1.2 Path of the Gods.
    • 9.1.3 Treasures of Mexico.
    • 9.1.4 Beautiful beaches.
  • 9.2 The landscape, cultural and tourist diversity.
    • 9.2.1 Magical towns.
    • 9.2.2 World Heritage

Bibliography
Book: México, Manual de civilización Español Lengua Extranjera
Delgadillo Macías Rosa Esther (2013), First Edition
ISBN: 978-84-7711-810-7 

 

 

 
   Placement test
Placement test
 
   Video
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Versión en español:
 
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